"OUR EXNING HEROES



The entry for those on the Memorial are included in their entry on this website.
The following extracts are from "Our Exning Heroes" but only for men who are NOT named on the Exning Memorial.
For the most part they are commemorated on the Newmarket Memorial, due no doubt to attendance at St Philips Church, St Philip's Road, Newmarket.
Spelling, punctuation and grammar is just as printed in the book.

Aley, Frank.
Born in S.Philip's Road in 1896. Educated at S.Mary's School and at Dullingham School. He was apprenticed to Mr Smallwood's stud and remained there until war broke out. He joined up immediately - in September 1914, in the 8th Suffolks. He was training in England about ten months, and went to France on the Ypres front and was badly gassed in September of that year. After five months rest he was again sent overseas on to the Somme front - and took part in the great attack in July, but on the third day of the attack was reported missing, and no news has been received since- only that he is supposed killed. He was a keen cricketer, and played for Mr. Denison-Pender's team in Hare Park, and was one of the best bowlers, and when in the Army he soon learnt to be a good bomb thrower, no doubt due to his cricket career, and secured first place in his battalion for bomb throwing.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Bailey, Walter John.
Born 1884 at Cowlinge. Educated in the local school. He was ostler at the Crown Hotel when war broke out, and joined up in 1916. He was only four months in training before he was sent to France. He was in the Oppy Wood attack near Arras and met his death by a shell.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Balls, A.E. R.G.A.
Albert Edward Balls joined the Royal Garrison Artillery on April 11th, 1916. On June 26th in the same year he went to France. He came home on leave on October 12th and seems to have contracted a serious illness on the journey home. After a few days spent with his friends in Exning, during which time he was getting rapidly worse, he was sent to the 1st Eastern Hospital, Cambridge, where he died on October 26th at the age of 28. He was buried in Exning Cemetery. He married at Cheveley Church, Emma Rose Osborn on July 26th, 1914 and leaves a widow and two children. Before joining the Army he was a general labourer at Upend. He spent a good deal of his spare evenings in doing fretwork.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Bowman, Percy William.
Born on Exning Road in 1891. Educated at S. Mary's School and went to Mr. Musk's, Butcher. There he was when war broke out, and he joined up in the 7th Suffolks on August 18th, 1914. He went to France about May, 1915, and was in most of the early fighting of that summer and autumn, being very badly wounded, from which he died not many hours after - before he got to hospital. He was a regular attendant at S. Philip's Church and Sunday School, and entered into the parochial life of the Church. Also a member of the choir.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Challice, Harry James.
Born in Newmarket. Educated at S. Mary's School. He was at Mr. Dyer's, the baker's, when war broke out. He joined up directly he was 18 years of age, and after 12 months' training in England, he went to France in April, after the German offensive began in 1918, and was in the line during the British retirement. He was killed in August, near Monchy-le Preuse. He was in the Tank Corps as a Machine Gunner. His tank was hit three times, the last penetrating the armour, and the splinters killing the Officer in charge and Private Challice.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Chambers, Henry.
He joined up on November 15t, 1915, and went out to France on December 9th, 1916. He was severely wounded on July 31st the following year and died of wounds on August 5th, at the age of 23. All his life he had taken the greatest interest in S. Philip's Church, and for several years had been one of its chief supporters. A Memorial Service was held for him on the Sunday evening after he died, when the Vicar preached from the words: God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes" (Rev. Vii 17) He referred to three special phases of his work in that Church. First, as Cross Bearer, when on Festivals, he used to carry the symbol of our Holy Faith. Second, as a Chorister, and at one time, a trainer of the Choir. Strange to say, his voice never broke, and he was able to sing a beautiful treble to the end. But it was specially on his reverent behaviour that the preacher dwelt. Third, as a Sunday School Teacher. "There are not many young men working hard all week who will practically give up the whole of Sunday to Christian work, but this he did all his young life. It was a pleasure to him to do it. You had only to look at his bright and happy face to see there manifested the life of Jesus".
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Chenery, Ernest Cecil.
Born in 1894 in Exning Road, and educated at S. Mary's Boys' School. As a school-boy he was in the Choir of S. Philip's Church, and for several years in the Choir of S. Mary's Church and also in S. Philip's Sunday School. He played football with the local Exning Road team and Newmarket football team. He was also a swimmer, and a good musician on the violin and organ. When war was declared, he was working in the printing office at Mr. Tindall's, and joined up in November, 1915, and was training in England for seven months. He went out to France in the spring of 1916, and was killed on October 7th the same year.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Clow, Harry Robert.
Born at 1, Newington Terrace, in 1898, and educated at Exning Road School, he was working at Mr. Palmer's, the fruiterer, when war broke out. He joined up directly he was 18, and was in training in England for about seven months. He went to France in May, 1916, and was reported missing -believed killed- on October 9th, 1917. He was a good footballer, and often played in the boys' teams of the district. He was at the Congregational Sunday School and attended the Bible Class there, also a member of the Congregational troop of Scouts. He was in the 1st Norfolk Regiment.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Clow, Bert Turner.
Born at Exning in 1881, educated at St. Mary's Boys' School, and worked for Major Beatie (sic).#Soon after war broke out he joined up in the 14th Warwickshire Regiment.. He went to France at the end of July, 1915, and was killed only three weeks afterwards.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Cole, H.J. 20th Durham Light Infantry
Henry James Cole, whose parents live at the Irrigation Cottages, joined the Army on February 16th, 1917. He went out to France in the following September, but shortly afterwards was sent to Italy, where he remained some months, and then returned to France. He was reported missing and wounded on September 4th, 1918, and up to the time of going to press nothing more has been heard of him, and we fear he must be numbered with the slain. On leaving school he went as an errand boy in Mr. Sheppard's shop, and was working his way up, and just before he joined the Army he was serving behind the counter. He was only twenty when he was reported missing.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Crompton, Joseph.
Born in Newmarket, 1894 and educated at St. Mary's Boys' School, and worked for Mr. W. Cook, confectioner. When war broke out he joined up, on September 1st, 1914, in the 8th Suffolks, and was afterwards, when in France, transferred to the 2nd Suffolks as a Sergeant. He was only in training in England about six months before going to France, and took part in nearly all the big battles, and won the Military Medal at Glaucan Wood. He was a member of the Congregational Church, and when a boy attended their Sunday School.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Evens, Ernest William.
Born in Newmarket, 1886. Educated at St. Mary's Boys' School, and trained as a stable-hand under Mr. George Blackwell. When war broke out he had been out of his apprenticeship about twelve months and was in Mr. C. Waugh's stables. He joined up in 1916, and was training in England for six months, going to France about May, 1917. He was on the Ypres front for some time, and met his death at Cambrai when the Germans advanced on that section at the beginning of the attack, March 22nd, 1918. He was in the South Lancashire Regiment.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Hammond, Edward.
Born in 1897, at Exning Road, educated at St. Mary's School, he worked at Messrs. Lang and Co.'s when war broke out.He at once joined Kitchener's Army, in the Suffolks, when only seventeen and a half, and went to France the following year, and for twelve months took part in various engagements. Then on the Somme, in September, 1916, he received very severe wounds, from which he died on admittance to hospital. He was a regular attendant at St. Philip's Church and Sunday School, also taking part in various parochial organisations.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Haylock, W. 2nd Suffolks.
William Haylock was born at Snailwell Junction, where his father was signalman. He was brother to Mrs. Woollard of Harraton Cottages, where his mother is now living. He joined up in September, 1914, and went out to France in the following July. After some eighteen months he was sent home to England with bad legs and septic sores, and was for some time in hospital at Felixstowe. He went out to France again in the early summer of 1917, and was killed on June18th of the same year. He had been over the top and they had taken the German trench when a shell came and killed him. When war broke out he was working on Lord Derby's farm, and previously had worked in the garden for Mr. Cannon, and had learnt to drive a motor. He was 29 when he died.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Hewish, William John.
Born in Cambridge and educated at the schools in Milton Road. He went to America in 1912, and was employed by the late George C. Bolt, in New York City. When war broke out he gave up his work and came to England to enlist in the Suffolk Yeomanry. After training in England for about six months, he went to the Dardanelles in September, 1915. He was at Gallipoli until the British forces were withdrawn, and then was sent to Suez for guarding the Canal, and took part in several skirmishes there. He then went to Palestine with the forward troops, and was brought back to France in May, 1918. He was killed on September 13th, 1918. Major F. Goldsmith, his company officer for some time, writes of him to his wife: "No one was more sorry to hear of your husband's death than I. He was a splendid fellow and one of the best men I had in the old squadron."
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Human, Victor.
Born at Isleham, in Cambridgeshire, in 1894. Educated at Isleham School, and after working for a short time locally on a farm, he went up to London in a good appointment. When war broke out he returned to Newmarket, and was with his parents until he joined up in the Machine Gun Corps. He was in England about ten weeks training, went out to France, and was killed in August, 1917. His Officer writes to his mother of him: "He was one of the most efficient members of the Platoon, and a most able soldier. He was very highly respected by the other fellows, and his death was looked on by all as a great loss, and I fell I have lost one of my best men."
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Milne, George Sidney.
Born in St. Philip's Road in 1895. Educated at St. Mary's Boys' School, and then worked in the Newmarket Gas Company's office, and for the Great Eastern Railway Company on Hertfordshire. He joined up in the spring of 1915 in the London Rifle Regiment and went to France the same year. He was invalided home owing to trench feet and rheumatism in March, 1916. After sick leave he was recalled to his regiment in France, and was killed in High Wood in September, 1918. He always sang in S. Etheldreda's Choir, and was in the Sunday School at St.Philip's.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Paske, Ernest George.
Born at Wickhambrook in 1866, and educated at Bury, he started on a farm at Fordham, then he went to the Rosary as under-coachman, and next to the Gas Works. He was there when war broke out, and immediately, although well over military age, he joined up in the Army Veterinary Corps and went to Ireland for training. As a Corporal he went out to Egypt, and then he was sent to France as a Sergeant. It was during some preparations for Military sports that a horse which he was riding failed in a jump, and both rider and horse fell, and Sergeant Paske was killed, being crushed by the horse. His officer writes to his wife: "Your husband was in my section and there was no man in the Section I held in higher esteem. He was not only a soldier but a splendid man all round. I have seen him out at all times and in all weathers attending to his horses, and showing a cheerful enthusiasm that must have sprung from a high sense of duty. His death is a great loss to the Battery."
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Perry, J.C. 7th Suffolks.
Joseph Cecil Perry was born on July 26th, 1888, and was educated at All Saints School, Newmarket. He joined up during the first month of the war and went out to France in the following May. He was severely wounded on August 27th, 1917, and died of wounds on September 18th at 5th Casualty Clearing Station, France. The Chaplain, who ministered to him in hospital, writes: "He had been terribly wounded and made a big fight for life. He was a very brave man and died as a very gallant Englishman." His Officer also writes: "He joined my platoon in January this year, and I soon formed a very high opinion of him. Perhaps he told you that I had several times asked him to let me make him Lance Corporal, but he preferred to remain a Private. I am sure further promotion would have come quickly." In 1916 he married Matilda Maud Rose, of the Brickfields, at Exning Church, and leaves one child. Before the war he was a stableman and worked for Mr Peck. He was a good runner, and won several prizes in Newmarket, Exning and other places.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Pond, Harry Charles.
Born on Exning Road and educated at All Saints' School, when war was declared he was working for Mr. Holland, builder. He joined up under the Derby Scheme although over age. He was trained at Tring and went to France in 1916 with the Yorkshire Regiment. He was badly wounded on the Ypres front and only survived twenty-four hours. He was buried at Poperinghe, his own comrades carrying him to the grave. A great follower of the Newmarket Football Team, though he did not play much himself.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Pryke, Gregory.
Born in Field Terrace Road in 1899, and educated at Exning Road School. He worked for Lady Freer when war broke out, and when she heard that he was killed, she wrote to his mother: "I cannot tell you how sorry I am ...he was so good in every way, always cheery and willing, and so keen in everything he did". He joined up when eighteen years of age, and went to France after only three months training, and was killed after being in the country only three weeks. His Commanding Officer writes: "During the short time he was with the Regiment he proved himself a brave soldier, and it was in the fearless execution of his duty that he was killed."
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Sharp, Walter James.
Born in 1894 at Wood Ditton, and educated at the village school. He was on Cheveley Estate for some years, and then went to Canada and worked on a farm. When war broke out he at once joined up in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, and was sent to France in 1916. In the autumn of that year he took part in the battle of the Somme and was killed by a rifle bullet.

Smithson, Harold Geoffrey.
Born in 1895, and educated at St Mary's School, he was apprenticed near Maidstone to learn butchering. Afterwards he went to London, and when war broke out he joined up in the 17th Manchester Regiment. After seven months training he went out to France and was made Corporal. He was in most of the engagements on the Somme and Ypres salient. He was killed on July 31st, 1917, at Zillebeke, near Ypres.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Smithson, Harry Robinson.
Born in 1892, and educated at St. Mary's School, he went to London and was employed on the Stock Exchange. Soon after war broke out he joined up in the Royal Irish Rifles, 12th Battalion. He was in many of the big battles during the summer of 1917 and the spring of 1918. He was reported missing on the 21st March, 1918 and no information could be secured by his parents until one of his comrades, who was taken prisoner, reported that he saw him killed by a detachment of Germans, who were sent to capture the machine gun he was using so effectively. He died thus doing his duty.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Steward, F.W. Labour Corps.
Frederick William Steward enlisted in the 3rd Suffolks on December the 29th, 1914. He went out to France in May, 1915, and after six months there he was sent to Salonika where he remained for 2 years. He then worked in England in the Labour Corps, and after a sever illness with several complications he died on January 9th, 1919, at the age of 25. He was interred at Stonham Parva, his native place. He was married in Exning Church on June 25th, 1918, to Florence Phoebe Durrand.The following lines are copied from his memorial card: Day by day we sadly miss him, Words will fail our loss to tell, But in Heaven we long to meet him, Evermore with him to dwell. Christ has gathered in our darling, Placed our bud among His flowers, Taken back the one He lent us, To a better home than ours.

Turner, Alfred James.
Born in Isleham in 1886, and educated at local school, came to Newmarket on leaving school and entered the grocery business with Messrs. Lang & Co., and was there until war broke out, nearly 20 years. He then joined up in the 1st Cambridgeshire Regiment, and trained at Halton Camp for the Signalling Section of that regiment. He went to France after ten months training, and was there only two months when he was reported missing. Since then no definite news has been heard of any kind, so, on the instruction of the War Office, he is believed killed.
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

Willis, James Vickers.
"Born on Exning Road, and educated at All Saints School, he was working as a tailor at Messrs. Golding and Sons' when war broke out. He took a great interest in the local Church Parades, and was an energetic worker of the Shepherd's Club. He was in the Volunteers for many years, and also joined the National Reserves, through which he succeeded in joining up. He went to France in December, 1916, and was a regimental tailor to the 24th Suffolks; but when there was a great shortage of men, after the German offensive in the spring of 1917, he was, with all cooks and stores men, rushed into the line, and met his death, by a rifle bullet through the head, on April 28th, 1917."
Commemorated on the Newmarket War Memorial

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